Overtoke TV News for 08-31-2018

Tom Segura: Completely Normal – The First 48

The Tragedy of Stoner Comedy

Fourteen states have effectively decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana, and on June 4 Mayor Bloomberg and the New York Police Department announced plans to follow suit in NYC. As marijuana goes mainstream, its media portrayal has likewise softened. In the film, marijuana transforms seemingly normal, upstanding American youth into maniacs similar to the opium fiends of earlier stereotypes. Drugs were everywhere: on the strip, where people dropped microtabs of acid and then painted themselves blue; in middle schools, where young pushers did the work of the Fagin-esque masterminds of the marijuana trade; and in middle-class homes, where the sharing of one joint led a young Don and Betty Draper-esque couple to neglect its newborn in a bathtub with a running faucet, where the tot ineluctably drowned. Their straggly long hair, stoner talk, and constant fiending for the demon weed established the stereotype that prevails, in various permutations, to this day. 

As happens when actors embrace caricature roles, both were typecast to such a degree that the stoner aesthetic took over their careers. Of late, the stoner comedy has become more realistic. The movie blended stoner stereotypes and broad humor with blood, gore, and violence. More than likely, the stoner comedies of the future will continue to play up the humor while conveniently overlooking the tragedy at the heart of American marijuana prohibition. Jails, especially in the South, have many occupants who are there simply for possession of marijuana. 

Whatever the case, there will be no stoner comedy that deals with the harm inflicted on a family when an adult male breadwinner is sent to state prison for what is essentially a victimless crime. Marijuana prohibition has been the gateway to an exponential expansion of the prison-industrial complex, but that’s a reality silver-screen fantasies will not touch. As with romantic comedies, which give us a skewed view of love, the stoner genre is riddled with distortions and misrepresentations-a bad trip worthy of the worst directors in Hollywood. 

Keywords: [“marijuana”,”stoner”,”film”]
Source: https://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/the-tragedy-of-stoner-comedy/

Interview: Elizabeth Ho talks Netflix’s cannabis comedy ‘Disjointed’

Currently starring in the Netflix Cannabis Comedy ‘Disjointed’, Elizabeth talks marijuana and working with Kathy BatesInterview by Adam Crookes. When I was first attending USC, my main goal was to just get myself to Los Angeles; I was using the university as an excuse to move down there. The plan I’d hatched in my brain was to pursue an acting career, strike it famous in a year, and leave Uni.Since fame did not immediately find me during my freshman year, I found myself at a loss and really facing reality for the first time in my life. I’d always been successful in achieving my goals, and I realized this Hollywood nut was on a whole new level of figuring out how to crack. I felt like I was living a double life: trying to balance the wishes of my family to be a business major while also trying to pursue my own creative ambitions. 

I hadn’t anticipated actually sticking with being a business major. I ended up taking a year off in between my freshman and sophomore year because I was so unhappy. Auditioning never fails to be a nerve-wracking process, even for those actors who’ve been doing it for their entire lives! Lucky for me, the material was fun and engaging. Working with Kathy Bates is a dream come true for me, and yes, I’m a huge fan of her work! 

This woman is a legend and rightfully so. I am beyond lucky to work with her on a daily basis. She taught us how that works: from the day-to-day store activities, to how the plants needed to look during each stage of their growth. You can catch Elizabeth Ho on ‘Disjointed’ on NETFLIX.. 

Keywords: [“work”,”audition”,”Disjointed”]
Source: https://medium.com/@CROOKES/interview-elizabeth-ho-talks-netflixs-cannabis-comedy-disjointed-crookes-magazine-4784df920ec0

Ngaio Bealum praised, but reviews criticize Netflix weed-cooking show

The latest Sacramento-area figure to bring his talents and expert opinion to a national audience is comedian and local columnist Ngaio Bealum. A week later, several reviews are in, and many of them are lukewarm on the execution of what was a mostly promising premise: Chefs competing head-to-head to see who can create the best edibles. The first season of the series contains 12 episodes, none longer than 15 minutes. Bealum, who performs marijuana-inspired comedy routines in Sacramento and the Bay Area and also writes a column for the Sacramento News and Review, serves as the program’s culinary weed expert. The show’s main host is YouTube personality Josh Levya. 

A glance at more in-depth write-ups by many national news outlets turns up mostly negative reviews, with a few common criticisms. Here’s a quick, THC-free taste of what some reviewers have said about Netflix’s first weed-based cooking show and Bealum’s role as a panel expert. Shapiro charged that the show lacked appeal to the average viewer, and that it does a poor job of explaining things like the differences between cannabis strains or the creation of weed oil. In her view, Bealum and the gang use too much jargon that only stoners or those in the weed industry will understand. Astre agrees that the stakes are pretty low – there are no cash prizes – but she also sees little harm done by the show, as much as it may be lacking in its execution of the concept. 

Keywords: [“show”,”cooking”,”High”]
Source: https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/california-weed/article214083234.html

Overtoke TV News for 07-03-2018

The Tommy Lama Comedy Show – Marijuana

“Cooking on High”: What You Need to Know about the Marijuana-Based Cooking Show’s Cast & Plot!

The name of this new Netflix cooking show is pretty much self-explanatory, but without knowing what it’s about, some may not get the clever pun. Cooking on High is a cooking show like Iron Chef or Top Chef, but with one major difference. Here are more facts about Cooking on High, which will premiere on June 22, 2018, only on Netflix! Cooking on High might sound like a peculiar name, but the show is all about being blunt! Hosted by popular YouTuber and comedian Josh Leyva, this au courant cooking show aims to pave the way for a whole new generation of crispy new cooking shows laced with ganja! 

With marijuana becoming legal in more and more places, a new style of cooking is taking over. Here are some things you can expect from the show, including facts about Cooking on High’s cast. Marijuana expert and stand-up comedian Ngaio Bealum has some seriously insane knowledge about weed, and he is a cast member on Netflix’s new show! The chefs competing are ready to whip out some cool new dishes to impress the judges, and Bealum is going to guide them about what they might be cooking with. Although everyone is going to be in the rasta mood on the show, don’t forget that it is still a competition after all! 

Chefs from across the nation, who are serious in making cannabis a cooking ingredient, are going to make sure they put their best plate forward. While Cooking on High’s judges are getting baked, they have a very critical task of rating the dishes, too! While there may have been shows in the past that have promoted cannabis-based cuisine, Cooking on High is probably going to be a pioneer of its kind. Heather Pasternak: The actress, writer, and comedian has performed stand-up on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert and is also known for the movies, Before You and Two Sisters. He is the creator of Highly Seasoned, a show on BREALTV, where viewers can get easy-to-make recipes using ganja to create culinary masterpieces. 

Keywords: [“cooking”,”show”,”Chef”]
Source: https://www.earnthenecklace.com/cooking-on-high-what-you-need-to…

Blunt talk: Medical marijuana takes root

Others worry that medical marijuana spells trouble of a different sort and is really just a smoke screen enabling full-blown recreational marijuana legalization to take root. Even as marijuana research continues to proliferate, public attitudes about its use and potential medical applications have undergone a seismic shift. In a 2017 CBS poll, 88 percent of respondents favored approving medical marijuana and 61 percent thought recreational use should be legal. Another study, conducted this year by Yahoo News and The Marist Poll, found that 83 percent of participants supported legalizing medical marijuana and 49 percent favored ending the ban on recreational use. The shift in attitudes toward marijuana and concurrent explosion of opioid abuse have left citizens and policymakers alike scratching their heads over an apparent paradox. 

A 2017 study published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence reported a 23 percent decrease in opioid dependence and a 13 percent drop in opioid-related overdoses in states with legal marijuana. Based on his experience, says Parks, he decided to join the fight for legalizing medical marijuana in North Carolina. Asked about the local VA Medical Center’s marijuana policies, public affairs officer Armenthis Lester explained that since the drug is illegal under federal law, VA physicians can neither prescribe nor conduct research with it. Despite its apparent promise, medical marijuana also carries risks. Regardless of where people stand on the issue, most of the folks Xpress spoke with believe legalizing medical marijuana is really only a question of when, not if. 

Still, Kight, whose cancer is now in remission, wants more people to know about how helpful marijuana can be for chemotherapy patients. Whether we’re talking about medical marijuana, opioids or any other drug, patients need to do their own research and ask questions about their treatment regimen, says Hall. 

Keywords: [“marijuana”,”medical”,”opioid”]
Source: https://mountainx.com/news/blunt-talk-medical-marijuana-takes-root

This comes with very strict requirements for researchers who want to study CBD, which means that few get to actually do that work. Much of the CBD oil you can currently buy online is actually derived from imported hemp, which also contains CBD in smaller amounts, says Reiman. A 2014 Cochrane review found four clinical trials looking into the antiepileptic effects of CBD. According to the review, all the studies were pretty low-quality, so the review’s authors concluded there wasn’t enough evidence to recommend CBD for the treatment of seizures just yet. By now Epidiolex, a CBD-based oil manufactured by GW Pharmaceuticals, has received orphan drug status for the treatment of Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes, which both cause severe, treatment-resistant childhood seizures. 

They’ve been allowed to give Epidiolex to about 200 people as part of a pilot program. For desperate parents who are already spending upwards of $600 a month buying highly concentrated CBD oil online, this could be a huge improvement. The results of the recent pilot study were promising, and there are now two double-blind Epidiolex trials underway. Because Epidiolex is derived from the marijuana plant, it is still considered a Schedule I drug during the trial phase. While CBD may provide relief for those suffering from seizures, evidence for the compound’s other potential uses is a little more complicated. 

Research has shown that patients with inflammatory bowel disease may find relief with medical marijuana, but find the psychoactive effects limiting. A 2012 double-blind, placebo-controlled trial began to do just that, but so far results are inconclusive. Another GW Pharmaceuticals phase-2 trial that examined the treatment of diabetes with marijuana turned out negative – no significant differences between the treatment and control groups. 

Keywords: [“CBD”,”trial”,”Epidiolex”]
Source: https://www.refinery29.com/2015/08/92201/cbd-medical-marijuana-facts