Overtoke TV News for 07-01-2018

Robert Schimmel: Medical Marijuana

MarijuanaDoctors.com Airs First Marijuana Television Commercial Ever Shown on a “Major Network”

Securing the airtime for our commercial on a major network was extremely difficult and at the same time, extremely satisfying. The spot began airing in New Jersey and is believed to be the first time that any major television network in the U.S. has allowed a commercial addressing the controversial subject matter and advertising the first ever medical marijuana service. MarijuanaDoctors.com draws this parallel in an attempt to prove the severity of consulting physicians in order to obtain medical marijuana for terminal & debilitating medical conditions where the doctor may recommend that the benefits of medical marijuana outweigh the risks of in order to improve a patients overall health. According to the company’s website, MarijuanaDoctors.com seeks to help patients with documented medical conditions, such as HIV/AIDS, cancer, chronic pain or any other ailment that is approved by their state of residence as a qualifying medical condition for cannabis, locate and book appointments with licensed doctors who are willing to recommend marijuana as a treatment for their ailments. 

The company does not promote the casual or recreational use of marijuana or any other prescription medication. The company condones only the use of marijuana as a medication for recognized ailments in accordance with state law, as it believes it is a proven treatment for many medical conditions. 20 states and Washington, DC have legalized medical marijuana for specific terminal and debilitating conditions. MarijuanaDoctors.com was founded as the trusted gateway for patients searching for medical marijuana treatment in legal medical marijuana states. The company provides patients visibility and transparency in selecting a doctor and setting an appointment for a medical marijuana evaluation including detailed profile information, scheduling information, and ratings and reviews. MD understands the uncertainty associated with the process and that medical marijuana is often the only effective treatment for many ailments for which traditional medicine provides little relief or is accompanied by uncomfortable and dangerous side effects. 

MD is dedicated to legitimizing the process for the booking and selection of medical marijuana doctors by standardizing the criteria and selection process for doctors allowed to join the company’s trusted network of quality physicians. MD also focuses on providing comprehensive scheduling and marketing services for doctors that are both already established medical marijuana physicians and those looking to expand practices into alternative medicine. 

Keywords: [“marijuana”,”medical”,”commercial”]
Source: https://www.prweb.com/releases/philipcardwell/press/prweb11632229.htm

Marijuana Movies |

Marijuana and the movies have had a long, mostly potent relationship. Cannabis has inspired any number of cinematic artists, and it’s important to note how public perception of pot has changed throughout the years, with evolving laws and a recent explosion of smoker-friendly content. Marijuana has been used in an erudite fashion by filmmakers, woven into the narrative like a character in Curtis Hanson’s masterpiece Wonder Boys, the iconic Coen brothers sensation The Big Lebowski, and the underrated Leaves of Grass. Oliver Stone’s entire cannon feels especially indebted to ganja, as does Terry Gilliam’s psychotropic adaptation of Hunter Thompson’s Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas. Self-professed cannabis enthusiast Robert Altman left a misty haze over much of his work, most notably The Long Goodbye, California Split, and M*A*S*H, while his protégé, Paul Thomas Anderson, crafted a pot-infused ode to private eye cinema with Inherent Vice. 

F. Gary Gray’s sly, smart, and hilarious pot comedy Friday still stands as one of the most influential cannabis narratives. The Seth Rogen/Judd Apatow connection has helped to legitimize marijuana to the masses, with box-office hits Pineapple Express and Knocked Up majorly emphasizing marijuana, treating it like a character as much as any of the leading actors. Musical biopic spoof Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story has some hilarious moments concerning reefer, the two Neighbors movies nearly give off a contact high, and the meta-comedy This Is The End carried a lit-joint torch of pro-pot components. Let’s not forget Danny McBride getting stoned with some sheep in Your Highness, which shared the skunky whiffs of 80’s cult-classics Krull and The Beastmaster. 

High school comedies have consistently thrown marijuana into the equation, with Amy Heckerling’s Fast Times at Ridgemont High and Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused standing as cultural touchstones. Nearly all of Kevin Smith’s films seem to have been born out of a cloud of bong smoke, with the Jay and Silent Bob characters feeling like zeitgeist-tapping creations of cannabis-happy comedy. Greg Araki’s Smiley Face with Anna Faris is one of the more perceptive and giggle-inducing movies to feature a stoner at its center, while Jonathan Levine’s unique 90’s time capsule The Wackness painted a portrait of people’s lives fully dictated by marijuana, and how it can be used both for good and bad. Written by Nick Clement. 

Keywords: [“Marijuana”,”stoner”,”comedy”]
Source: http://bttm.co.uk/marijuana-movies

Rotten Tomatoes

Birthplace: Winterset, Iowa, USA. Arguably the most popular – and certainly the busiest – movie leading man in Hollywood history, John Wayne entered the film business while working as a laborer on the Fox lot during summer vacations from U.S.C., which he attended on a football scholarship. Wayne was cast in small roles in Ford’s late-’20s films, occasionally under the name Duke Morrison. It was Ford who recommended Wayne to director Raoul Walsh for the male lead in the 1930 epic Western The Big Trail, and, although it was a failure at the box office, the movie showed Wayne’s potential as a leading man. It was in action roles that Wayne excelled, exuding a warm and imposing manliness onscreen to which both men and women could respond. 

In 1939, Ford cast Wayne as the Ringo Kid in the adventure Stagecoach, a brilliant Western of modest scale but tremendous power, and the actor finally showed what he could do. Wayne nearly stole a picture filled with Oscar-caliber performances, and his career was made. He starred in most of Ford’s subsequent major films, whether Westerns; war pictures; or serious dramas. Most of these films were extremely successful, and included such titles as Angel and the Badman, Island in the Sky, The High and the Mighty, and Hondo. The 1958 Western Rio Bravo, directed by Howard Hawks, proved so popular that it was remade by Hawks and Wayne twice, once as El Dorado and later as Rio Lobo. 

At the end of the 1950s, Wayne began taking on bigger films, most notably The Alamo, which he produced and directed, as well as starred in. During the early ’60s, concerned over the growing liberal slant in American politics, Wayne emerged as a spokesman for conservative causes, especially support for America’s role in Vietnam, which put him at odds with a new generation of journalists and film critics. McLintock!, which, despite well-articulated statements against racism and the mistreatment of Native Americans, and in support of environmentalism, seemed to confirm the left’s worst fears, but also earned more than ten million dollars and made the list of top-grossing films of 1963-1964. 

Keywords: [“Wayne”,”film”,”Ford”]
Source: https://www.rottentomatoes.com/celebrity/john_wayne

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