marijuana comedy News for June 29 2017

Funny marijuana stoner comedy show Ep32Part2

Funny marijuana stoner comedy show. This part features a stoner show about talking weed nuggs called Best Budz, then a hot knifing tutorial including paddling …

Arj Barker (Flight of the Conchordx / The Marijuana-logue) | Cobb’s …

Win a pair of tickets from FuncheapSF. Arj Barker (Flight of the Conchordx / The
Marijuana-logue) | Cobb’s Comedy Club Thursday, June 29, 2017 – 8:00 pm
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‘Silicon Valley’ and the Return of Stoner Television

With experience in both British and American network and cable television, Shapeero has a unique perspective on the shifting attitudes toward marijuana in media. Critics of on screen marijuana use like the Parents Television Council have maintained that normalization of drug use in media sends the wrong message and perpetuates more usage. “I don’t think television is doing anything to be the driving force of that. People are out there in the world.” Even on set, he says filming scenes with a stoned character or marijuana doesn’t require any specific direction only, “Actors will sometimes ask ‘How stoned do you want me to go?’ But I don’t give them any coaching. People bring their own experiences to the performance and marijuana affects everyone differently.” Gillian Jacobs’s character Britta Perry on Community is one of the few open marijuana users on network television. “Dan [Harmon] is very clever at representing the culture in another way and making everybody behave as if was marijuana or some other drug. Those episodes are really fun to work on because you have that sort of freedom back. You’ve replaced the illegal thing that we’re not allowed to talk about or show and now you can tell a story.” Writing for The Atlantic in 2013, Scott Meslow examined the rehabilitation of televised marijuana usage citing mid-90s programs such as Roseanne, Home Improvement, and That ’70s Show as proof the medium was starting to treat the issue with less “Demonization” and more “New frankness.” Acceptability opened up the potential of telling marijuana stories, but criminal justice efforts made visual representations of the drug’s use confront the negative stigma surrounding cannabis. In the twin episodes “Moon Over Point Place” and “Reefer Madness,” not only does the character purchase marijuana off screen and to fit in, but it is contained in a nondescript paper bag like a truck stop porno mag and a police officer appears almost immediately. The trope appeared on 1970s television screens in Barney Miller’s “You Dirty Rat” and Sanford & Son’s “Fred’s Treasure Garden.” The 1980s saw the trope appear in the Laverne and Shirley episode “I Do, I Do,” the 1982 episode of Taxi “The Road Not Taken,” and even as recently as the 2009 episode of Everybody Hates Chris, “Everybody Hates Lasagna.” In 2012, the trope appeared on the 2 Broke Girls episode “…And the High Holidays” when a bag of weed accidentally falls into a batch of cupcakes. Two recent episodes of Raising Hope and Growing Up Fisher featured marijuana usage. Tommy Chong guest starred, as Cloris Leachman’s boyfriend, on the Raising Hope marijuana episode and Leachman uses her age to legitimize her right to smoke. In the 1997 episode “The Canine Mutiny,” marijuana is discovered on a blind character in front of the police. By virtue of their ubiquity, most of the negative associations with marijuana use come from reality television programming like Cops. Other marijuana coverage in reality television has also focused on law enforcement efforts. When asked if legalization would affect cannabis in television, Tristram Shapeero says, “Just because it becomes legal, they won’t ever replace what marijuana does when we’re trying to use it in comedy. Alcohol is legal, but we still use it to great effect because it alters the mind.” Shapeero does point out that, “It may not have the rebellious edge it does now.”
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Netflix Are Making A New Weed Comedy Called Disjointed

SHARE. There shall be a way to chill, and it shall be Netflix, and it is good! The watch-when-you-want mogul pops out more projects than Detroit and their latest is going to be all about weed. If you love cannabis comedy, then you need to ‘stay tuned’ for the upcoming series, Disjointed. The Big Bang Theory’s Chuck Lorre and the Daily Show’s David Javerbaum co-wrote the show, putting their talent with script writing together. In searching for a home for the cannabis-themed comedy, the duo initially set their sights on various networks before deciding on making a Netflix exclusive. While the subject of everyday cannabis might seem a little racy for regular network television, Netflix has shown that it can tackle tough subject matter with style and, dare I say, balls. Netflix features original series that have begun to rival the followings of major networks. Disjointed makes the third multi-cam series for the company, after Fuller House and The Ranch. Other Netflix original greats include Orange is the New Black, House of Cards, Narcos, and Bloodline, to name a few. With an original cannabis series added to their impressive collection of documentaries and much-loved movies about the herb, Netflix poses to make on-demand internet streaming media history. From the days of Cheech & Chong, stoner comedy had dug itself a deep hole. Shows such as Weeds have helped to mainstream the image of marijuana into everyday culture if not yet complete acceptance. Netflix placed the order for 20 episodes of Disjointed, and if the excitement over the show is in any way telling of its potential success, we can expect to see many more than that. As for when the show will actually air, we will have to wait and see. What Netflix shows are you addicted to? Tell us on social media or in the comments below.
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Kayvan Khalatbari rolls weed, pizza and comedy into Denver empire The Denver Post

Kayvan Khalatbari generally appears calm, happy and confident, whether he’s on stage for a marijuana policy speech, in the conference room of his Denver Relief pot business, handing out coupons after a comedy show, or seated in one of his Sexy Pizza shops – where the free-pie coupons transform into food. On top of that, Khalatbari is also occasionally That Guy in the Chicken Suit, harshly mocking Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper over his stances on legalized marijuana as well as a philanthropist who sits on nonprofit boards and donates his time and money to kids. “I’m glad I’ve done a lot of odd jobs,” Khalatbari said from his Denver Relief office, dressed in his standard black polo shirt bearing the company logo. “There are a million ways to give back and be creative and synergize your business,” said Khalatbari, who in addition to co-founding Denver Relief’s Green Team volunteer group will donate about $50,000 this year to sponsor local comedy podcasts and live showcases – more than double what he gave in 2013. “None of us had made pizza or run a restaurant before,” Khalatbari said of the joint, a former Pizza Vera outlet on Capitol Hill. Khalatbari worked behind the counter at Sexy Pizza for the better part of the year, consistently losing money on his $40,000 personal investment. Early on New Year’s Day in 2009, while coming down from a psychedelic mushroom trip, Khalatbari suggested to some of his Sexy Pizza cohorts that they start a medical-marijuana dispensary. It creates a tight schedule for the early-to-rise Khalatbari, leaving little time for a personal life or romantic relationships – especially since Sexy Pizza now has two more locations. The combined stores are on track to earn about $2.5 million this year, which allows Khalatbari to spend money sponsoring a dozen-plus Denver comedy shows such as “Too Much Fun,” “Propaganda!” and the High Plains Comedy Fest. Later this month, Khalatbari will launch an ambitious Sexpot Comedy website, which seeks to unite the disparate strands of Front Range funny – similar to what the Nerdist network has done in Los Angeles – while also marketing Khalatbari’s cannabis and pizza products to a coveted demographic of young, hip culture hounds. Khalatbari doesn’t expect a traditional financial return from the thousands he devotes to sponsoring local stand-up shows and culture podcasts each month. “Every 30 days I’m spending probably a third of what I would on print advertising and getting much more from it because these are doing weekly and monthly shows,” said Khalatbari, who credits the Grawlix comedy troupe for laying the groundwork for Denver’s nationally renowned stand-up scene. Changing perceptions of his industry – whatever it may be at the time – and helping kids by volunteering for Big Brother programs or serving on boards like the Colorado Youth Symphony Orchestra is “a selfish act,” Khalatbari claims. “I’m internally frustrated with myself all the time,” said Khalatbari, whose work ethic helps balance a self-described “Depressed” state.
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Pittsburgh NORML

Pittsburgh Norml and Pittsburgh Norml Women’s Alliance are happy to bring you Nature’s Way Yoga starting 4/22/17 at 3PM at Island Underground Studios.
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Late Night Political Jokes Late Night Jokes Updated Daily

The latest political jokes by all of the late-night comedians, … you weren’t great for comedy. … he’s been a vocal opponent of marijuana legalization.
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Medical Marijuana Extravaganja Comedy Tour

High Hopes: Raising Awareness of the Benefits of Medical Marijuana Through Comedy & Compassion
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Study: Medical marijuana changes how employees use sick …

Cannabis plants grow at Vireo Health’s medical marijuana cultivation facility in Johnstown … “It feels like comedy is a weapon that we can use …
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